What You Should Be Drinking: Ramos Gin Fizz

What You Should Be Drinking: Ramos Gin Fizz

The Ramos Gin Fizz

I had to cover this drink sooner or later, and I readily accept that many of you may never have even heard of it.  The Ramos Gin Fizz tends to be a drink whispered in hushed tones among bartenders.  I’ve yet to see it on a menu, and it probably ranks above the Old Fashioned in the amount of effort required to make it.

Created sometime in 1888 by Henry Ramos in New Orleans, first serving it at the Imperial Cabinet Saloon, then later the Stag Saloon in 1907.

Henry Ramos’ method of making the drink required it to be shaken for a full five minutes to achieve the necessary silky texture that makes the Ramos Gin Fizz so special.  If you’ve ever spent any prolonged time shaking cocktails (on a busy night, we used to estimate that we would make something in the region of 200 to 300), you’ll know that it doesn’t take long for the shaker to get pretty damn cold.

Most cocktails will be shaken for something around 10 to 20 seconds, or as general wisdom tells us, “until the tin becomes too cold to hold”.  Therein lies the problem.  There’s a very real possibility that in the course of making a Ramos Gin Fizz, you will find that you become frozen to your cocktail shaker.  To help prevent this, it rather helps to have a willing friend with whom you can divide the shaking duties.

Alternatively, you can use a blender, and take all the effort out of it entirely.  I’ll be talking you through this path of least resistance, but I really do suggest you try making it the traditional way.  Pay your dues.

You may look at the ingredients and think that they can’t possibly combine to make anything other than a horrible, curdled mess.  You would be wrong.  The Ramos Gin Fizz is an incredible creation.  The flavours are subtle, it’s not hugely alcoholic, but the genius is in the texture.  The combination of the cream and egg white produces a wonderful, thick, silky-smooth cocktail.  Luxurious is probably a good way to describe it.

“If you don’t have an ice crusher, the easiest way to do this is to put some ice cubes betwixt two (clean) tea towels and beat the living crap out of them with a rolling pin. I like to think of Justin Bieber’s smarmy face, if it helps.”

How to Make It

Have you got a blender? No? Go out and buy one – I’ll wait.

 

 

 

 

Now that you’ve got your blender, this recipe makes enough for two drinks.  So either give one to a friend, or just double-park and polish them both off yourself.  Start by crushing enough ice to fill one champagne flute.  If you don’t have an ice crusher, the easiest way to do this is to put some ice cubes betwixt two (clean) tea towels and beat the living crap out of them with a rolling pin.  I like to think of Justin Bieber’s smarmy face, if it helps.

Put the ice in the blender, and to it add the following:

  • 50ml gin
  • 25ml single cream
  • 1 raw egg white
  • 12.5ml sugar syrup (gomme)
  • 12.5ml lime juice
  • 12.5ml lemon juice
  • 6ml orange flower water

Blend the mixture until its texture is thick, smooth and silky.  The ice should have fully blended into the drink – if there are shards, it could probably do with a bit longer.

Divide the mixture evenly between two champagne flutes and top with soda water.  Garnish with a half wheel of orange. Drink, and marvel at your efforts.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *